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The new INTEGRIS Moore Community Hospital, which brings a transformative concept of health care to Central Oklahoma, is officially open and accepting patients.
A Grand Opening ribbon-cutting event was held Feb. 26 to introduce the new hospital, at 1401 SW 34th St. in Moore. Speakers included Glenn Lewis, mayor of Moore, Kathy Gillette, president and CEO of the Moore Chamber of Commerce, Jamie Crow, membership director of the South Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce and State Senator Darrell Weaver.
The 60,685 square-foot INTEGRIS Moore Community Hospital, which opens to the public today (Feb. 27), is part of a major initiative in which INTEGRIS will, in 2019, open four new community hospitals – small-format facilities also known as micro-hospitals or neighborhood hospitals – in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area.
The INTEGRIS Community Hospital at Council Crossing, 9417 N. Council Road., opened Feb. 6. The INTEGRIS Del City Community Hospital at 4801 SE 15th St., is scheduled to open March 6, and the INTEGRIS OKC West Community Hospital at 300 S. Rockwell Ave., will open in May.
As part of its expansion initiative, INTEGRIS, the state’s largest nonprofit health care system, entered into a joint venture partnership with Emerus, the nation’s first and largest operator of micro-hospitals hospitals, to build and manage the facilities.
“Each new community hospital is an innovative way to create more access points for people who are seeking care,” said Timothy Pehrson, president and chief executive officer at INTEGRIS. “We think the citizens of Moore will find this facility to be more convenient, more affordable and if they need higher levels of care, they’ll be connected to all the great things people have come to expect from INTEGRIS.”
Emerus Chief Executive Officer Craig Goguen said the company is honored to partner with INTEGRIS, an award-winning, highly respected health system brand, as it expands its footprint throughout central Oklahoma. “Our transformative concept of health care allows great health systems like INTEGRIS to expand its reach into the community to provide a variety of patient services that are fast, convenient and economical.”
These new community hospitals will serve a variety of patient needs including emergency medical care, inpatient care and other comprehensive health services. While the ancillary services vary, each community hospital has a set of core services including the emergency department, pharmacy, lab and imaging.
The rest of the services depend on the needs of the community, but common examples include primary care, dietary services, women’s services and low-acuity outpatient surgeries. The community hospitals offer:
* Health system integration — allowing for care coordination, consultation and seamless transition across the care continuum
* Fully licensed as a hospital and subject to all hospital conditions of participation and regulatory requirements
* Emergency-trained physicians and outpatient ambulatory clinical services on site — ensuring patients receive the highest quality care, when they need it
* Inpatient bed capacity — allowing patients to stay closer to home when lower level admissions/recoveries are needed
* All patients accepted without regard to insurance or ability to pay, including Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare
* Community-based hospitals open 24 hours a day, seven days a week – offering ease of access to our patients

Jacqueline Lewis, former trainee, and Tonya Harjo, NICOA counselor

NICOA SCSEP – NATIONAL INDIAN COUNCIL ON AGING SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM – is a federally funded program, serving the low-income job seeking population 55 and over. Arnetta Yancey, SCSEP Central Region Program Manager, NICOA stated: “The program offers paid on-the-job training, job search assistance, help in writing a resume and tips on improving interviewing skills. This is a four (4) year training program and is the only federal program for low-income U.S. citizens, age 55 and over. The program is administered by the U.S. Department of Labor under the authority of the Older Americans Act of 1965. The program is free to participants and host agencies.”
NICOA SCSEP participants provide community services for public agencies or nonprofit organizations providing much needed staff in the workplace. Positions are 20 hours per week at minimum wage. The NICOA SCSEP staff focuses on matching job seekers with agencies offering job training in their field of interest. Information on Job Fairs, mentoring, and counseling are available to all. Participants are offered the opportunity to take part in trainings provided by NICOA SCSEP and host agencies. These trainings include ESL, computer literacy, telephone systems and other skills specific to their field of interest and job assignments.
While many seniors need to work to supplement their income, others want the workplace camaraderie and personal fulfillment working provides. NICOA SCSEP is an organization which can help in either case. For seniors’ educational barriers may exist in getting a job in this fast-paced, ever changing work environment. Some may not have the skill sets applicable while physical limitations may prevent others from working in their previous jobs. Some career fields impacted include construction, oil field, plumbing, welding, waitressing or any field requiring physical strength and stamina. For other seniors, becoming proficient in technology skills needed in the workplace is the goal. Many seniors need training in using the internet, social media and computer programs, such as Word, Publisher or Excel.
The goal is for each trainee to find a job outside of the NICOA SCSEP program. In Oklahoma County, NICOA currently has 60 elders enrolled and have placed over 30% of the participants in employment. In 2018, NICOA partnered with more than 35 community agencies including The Salvation Army, Lottie’s House, Department of Veterans Affairs, Heartline 211 and Oklahoma County Senior Nutrition. Diane Maguire, North Coordinator for The Salvation Army, oversees the Warr Acres and Danforth Senior Centers, stated “NICOA SCSEP trainees have been a blessing in many ways for us at The Salvation Army Senior Centers. Having them be a part of the staff has given us the ability to do more for our seniors. Throughout their training I have watched them build skills that have enabled them to serve our senior citizens, ‘the golden generation,’ with both skill and love.”
Jacqueline Lewis, a former NICOA trainee, gave a pep talk and shared her success story with Paycheck Club participants in Oklahoma City. Jacci’s story: “When I applied to this program, I felt defeated. The job-hunting process has changed so much from the earlier years. Beginning with my very first host site to the last one, the things I learned were invaluable. This program teaches self-worth for the aging population that still wants to work. The staff will listen to your concerns and guide you in the best direction. They provide workshops and interview techniques along with the onsite training to better prepare you to reenter the work force. This program is a confidence builder that at 55+ you can step out and succeed. I am now employed full time thanks to this program. If you have barriers to employment start here for help in overcoming them and success in job search.”
Jacci joined NICOA SCSEP to prepare herself to be a viable candidate for employment. She wanted to enhance her skills, learn new processes and techniques, become proficient in computer programs in daily use. At NICOA SCSEP Jacci said she found all of this and more; “The moral support, guidance, advice and workshops kept me on target and focused.” She has been full-time employed for over 18 months and loves having a meaningful job.
If you are looking for a way to learn, develop and refine marketable skills call NICOA SCSEP to learn of your options. NICOA SCSEP provides the opportunity for paid training, meaningful community service, skills development and a great support network.
Ms. Yancey stated: “Our elders have so much experience and knowledge to contribute we must give them viable options. NICOA SCSEP offers options. Contact our office at 405-254-3642”.

Photography and Text by Terry “Travels with Terry” Zinn t4z@aol.com

Allied Arts announces that their 2019 fundraising event, ARTini, will take place on April 12, 2019 at Science Museum Oklahoma from 7 P.M. to 11 P.M. ARTini is one of the year’s most popular fundraising events, bringing together local restaurants, entertainment and artists for a night of fun for a good cause. This year’s event, STAR-tini, will present a galaxy theme—from décor and lighting to entertainment and cocktails—and guests are invited to dress the part.
Having attended and exhibited at several previous ARTini events, I can vouch that this event combines Original Art from abstract to realism for purchase, sampling of fine restaurants’ finger food offerings, and imaginative sips of original and fanciful Martinis made and offered by a number of local venues. The congenial gathering is accented by patrons eager for a good time and to see and be seen by friends of art conscious guests. Music entertainment is usually a staple and there are always surprises such as one year; live mannequins, which were a delightful photographic attraction. Good natured selfies and group photos are encouraged.
Event proceeds benefit Allied Arts and the local nonprofit arts organizations it supports. Each year, Allied Arts contributes to more than 40 organizations that collectively impact more than a million individuals. Allied Arts grantees have programming in all 77 Oklahoma counties—working to ensure that the arts are accessible to everyone from all walks of life.
As a United Arts Fund, Allied Arts works to broaden support for the arts by raising financial support for cultural organizations, encouraging participation and attendance, advocating for arts education and promoting excellence in the arts and arts management. Since its founding in 1971, the organization has raised more than $67 million to advance the arts in central Oklahoma.
ARTini is presented by Catalyst, Allied Arts’ emerging professionals group. Joining Catalyst requires an annual donation to Allied Arts of $300 for a single membership or $500 for a couple. Membership includes ticket(s) to ARTini, as well as networking, learning and volunteer opportunities throughout the year.
Allied Arts contributes to approximately 40 organizations annually. Member agencies include: Ambassadors’ Concert Choir, Arts Council Oklahoma City, Carpenter Square Theatre, Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma and Thelma Gaylord Academy, Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art, also Oklahoma City Ballet, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Oklahoma City Philharmonic, Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park, Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (OVAC), Prairie Dance Theatre, Red Earth, Inc., Science Museum Oklahoma and The Sooner Theatre among others.
More than 800 guests are expected to enjoy a sampling of martinis from several Oklahoma City restaurants and partake in one of the largest silent art auctions in the region – featuring work from around 100 local artists. ARTini tickets are $100 and must be purchased in advance. Tickets will go on sale shortly, and sponsors, artists, and restaurants will soon be available. You must be at least 21 and display a valid ID to to enter the event.
For more information, about ARTini or Catalyst, contact Allied Arts at 405-278-8944 or visit alliedartsokc.com.

Mr. Terry Zinn – Travel Editor
Past President: International Food Wine and Travel Writers Association
http://realtraveladventures.com/author/zinn

LAWTON – Nichole Lorenzen is bringing the farm to the city one art project at a time.
Owner of Lorenzen Farm Art, Nichole Lorenzen creates farmhouse decor and gifts from her original watercolor paintings. She offers her paintings in real barn wood frames and prints on tile, metal, coasters, car coasters, bookmarks and magnets.
“Being able to offer farm tractor art prints to people that own or remember their pieces of equipment makes me feel like I am bringing agriculture into a few more homes,” Lorenzen said.
She said what makes her art special is that it is created from what she sees on her own farm where she bales hay and tends to cattle alongside her husband. Lorenzen said she loves that she can paint and work while watching the kids and dogs play all while the cattle bawl in the background. She loves the idea of growing a business at her farm.
Lorenzen Farm Art was started in 2013 when Lorenzen was accepted to an art show. In 2017 she opened her online Etsy store. This year, she has added Amazon and is currently building a website for wholesale and retail shoppers. She also sets up booths at art shows and festivals.
“The booth should feel like a country home that says, ‘Come in, leave your boots on the porch and grab a sweet tea,’” Lorezen said. “It brings a smile to your face and lightens your load. The artwork is bright and happy. It reminds you of good old memories from Grandpa’s farm.”
Lorenzen’s goal is to continue expanding her operation into gift shops and businesses across the state and nation. Lorenzen Farm Art recently joined the Made in Oklahoma Program. To learn more about the business, visit www.nicholelorenzen.com or find the company on Facebook, Instagram or Etsy.

How do you stay active? Warr Acres Senior Center

I’m never still. I like to line dance twice a week. Sharon Garrett

I have a cardio machine in my lanai and get out three times a week. Burna Hankins

I like to line dance and play ping pong every now and then. Billie Willis

I don’t. I do like to line dance. Rita Knight

5 Ways to Spot a Lottery Scam

You get a phone call or a letter in the mail informing you that you just won millions in a lottery. Could this be your lucky day? More than likely, no, as this is a very common scam that preys on your excitement to claim a big prize.
To finish out our series of scams, did you know that in 2017, nearly 500,000 people fell victim to lottery scams? The reported losses alone totaled $117 million and that’s only what was reported. The actual number of victims and losses are probably larger, as many victims are too embarrassed to report it. These scams, commonly referred to as “advance fee”, “lottery” or “sweepstake” scam, often begin with fraudsters informing you that you’ve won a lottery or sweepstake raffle. You are issued a check worth more than the amount owed and instructed to pay “taxes and fees” before receiving a lump sum payment. Unfortunately, the check, in addition to the raffle, is false.
There is no legitimate reason for someone who is giving you money to ask you to send money back. That’s a huge red flag that it’s a scam. To help prevent you from falling victim to this scam, here are some helpful tips to keep you from getting tricked.
* Don’t be fooled by the appearance of the check. Scam artists are using sophisticated technology to create legitimate looking counterfeit checks. Some are counterfeit money orders, some are phony cashier’s checks and others look like they are from legitimate business accounts. The company name may be real, but someone has forged the checks without their knowledge.
* Verify the requestor before you wire or issue a check. It is important to know who you are sending money to before you send it. Just because someone contacted you doesn’t mean they are a trusted source.
* Ensure a check has “cleared” to be most safe. Under federal law, banks must make deposited funds available quickly, but just because you can withdraw the money doesn’t mean the check is good, even if it’s a cashier’s check or money order. Be sure to ask if the check has cleared, not merely if the funds are available before you decide to spend the money.
* Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately. Bank staff are experts in spotting fraudulent checks. If you think someone is trying to pull a fake check scam, don’t deposit it— report it. Contact your local bank or the National Consumers League’s Fraud Center, fraud.org.

by Corporal Kim Lopez, TRIAD Coordinator for all of Oklahoma County

Telephone scams, remember the good ole days when you just requested an unlisted number? Yes, those days are gone, I remember my parents saying, “this is an unlisted number” like all mankind would respect it. I’ve spent almost 33 years of my life dedicated to my community and as I look back on the good works of law enforcement officers of the past it’s laughable that we use to tell people “Just Hang Up!” this is no longer good advice. In today’s world you can no longer trust the caller ID boxes we worked so hard to hand out to seniors who couldn’t afford one. These scammers can use software to make calls look like they are coming from anywhere, even the pentagon. The first thing seniors need to understand is that other cultures believe that it is perfectly honorable, acceptable and smart to cheat others out of their money. Unlike our belief system here, they actually believe that they have harmlessly out smarted you to their benefit. There is no guilt associated with their actions to gain your money. The second thing to understand is that in other countries they believe every senior citizen is sitting on a huge three hundred thousand dollar nest egg! Hard to convince them otherwise when some people are sending over two hundred thousand dollars to crooks who promise to be someone they are not! Romance Scams, Solicitation Scams, Granny Scams and even IRS Scams require one thing, your cooperation!Telephone scams, remember the good ole days when you just requested an unlisted number? Yes, those days are gone, I remember my parents saying, “this is an unlisted number” like all mankind would respect it. I’ve spent almost 33 years of my life dedicated to my community and as I look back on the good works of law enforcement officers of the past it’s laughable that we use to tell people “Just Hang Up!” this is no longer good advice. In today’s world you can no longer trust the caller ID boxes we worked so hard to hand out to seniors who couldn’t afford one. These scammers can use software to make calls look like they are coming from anywhere, even the pentagon. The first thing seniors need to understand is that other cultures believe that it is perfectly honorable, acceptable and smart to cheat others out of their money. Unlike our belief system here, they actually believe that they have harmlessly out smarted you to their benefit. There is no guilt associated with their actions to gain your money. The second thing to understand is that in other countries they believe every senior citizen is sitting on a huge three hundred thousand dollar nest egg! Hard to convince them otherwise when some people are sending over two hundred thousand dollars to crooks who promise to be someone they are not! Romance Scams, Solicitation Scams, Granny Scams and even IRS Scams require one thing, your cooperation!I recently learned that some of my seniors in SALT (Seniors And Law enforcement Together) that they answer every call because they do not have voice mail, they feel more comfortable answering calls of their own area code and some even admitted feeling more comfortable if the prefix matched theirs. All are false, a gross false sense of security.  Many are intended to provoke you to call a number.  Many use sad emotional stories about one’s family being in fatal car accidents to entice you to make a call, unbeknownst to an adult entertainment network overseas.  All will come at a cost and all will have one common dominator: A SENSE OF EMERGENCY! In regard to IRS Scams, it’s important to understand that the IRS will notify you in writing should you need to be notified of lack of payment.  Criminal warrants are usually threatened that do not exist. If you know anyone who hangs their head at owing the IRS money and you feel they could be scammed, share this sage advice:1. Do not answer your phone unless you are certain of the caller.2. Never give any numbers associated with your financial well-being.3. Never call numbers back. Make a note of the number they are calling from and make a note of the number they want you to call back as many times these are different. Report these numbers to the IRS. These reports should be handled as IRS Impersonation Scams, report all of them to 1-800-366-4484 or complete a form online at WWW.tigta.gov.  If you do owe money for federal taxes or think you may owe taxes call 1-800 829-1040 IRS workers can help you with payment questions.Remember the IRS will never call to demand immediate payment, they will never demand you pay taxes without giving you opportunity to question or appeal and you will never be required to use a specific payment method such as prepaid debit cards.We currently hold 19 key core community groups about topics such as IRS Scams and many more. Get involved with local police and your Oklahoma County Sheriff’s office by calling 405-713-1950 and leaving your address, I will send you a reminder call every month to the Seniors And Law enforcement or SALT group near you. SALT works to prevent crimes against the 65 plus population and holds monthly meetings to be more accessible to you should you have questions or crime concerns. I am Corporal Kim Lopez, TRIAD Coordinator for all of Oklahoma County and I look forward to meeting you.

By Ron Hendricks

Dementia could be reduced if everyone with hearing loss would seek treatment. Dr. Pam Matthews, Oklahoma City Audiologist, explained to the Monday meeting of Central Oklahoma Chapter of Hearing Loss Association of America (COC HLAA) how hearing loss and decreased brain functions are connected. If the brain does not receive signals from the ear, it must work harder to fill in the blank spaces to the detriment of other brain functions — bringing on cognitive disorders. An early visit to the audiologist at first sign of hearing loss, could help prevent Dementia.
Pam discussed how a new hearing aid wearer reported good hearing in the low registers, but had lost over 50% in the upper ranges. New hearing aids allowed the wearer to once again hear high pitched sounds like children’s laughter, the squeak of a door hinge, or the tinkling of running water. It is encouraging to know that a visit to the audiologist could help combat potential loss of brain activity. A hearing test is the best way to know for sure if you have hearing loss.
Do you have hearing loss? Hear a few of the most common symptoms according to the National HLAA: Do you:
* Ask people to repeat what they say * Have trouble following the conversation in groups * Think others are mumbling * Frequently turn up the volume on the TV or car radio * Have difficulty on the phone * Oversleep because you didn’t hear your alarm clock * Have difficulty hearing or understanding speech at the movies * Avoid going to noisy parties and restaurants
Hearing tests are easy and available online and at many locations here in the OKC metro. In many cases, the initial screening is free. See any of the fine Audiologists here in the Oklahoma City area for more information.

COC HLAA has served Oklahoma’s hearing loss population for 27 years and is going strong for 2019. Two informational and educational meetings are held monthly and both are open to the public and are free. Meetings are captioned and are a safe and friendly place if you have hearing loss or love someone with hearing loss. Again, this year we will give two scholarships of $1,000 each to students heading for higher education this fall. We are actively involved in making Oklahoma City more accessible to those with hearing loss thru our LOOP OKC drive — getting hearing Loops installed in public facilities. And for over 20 years the Hearing Helpers Room has encouraged Oklahomans to live well with hearing loss; open Monday – Friday, 10-3, at 5100 N Brookline, Suite 100. Stop by to try a device in person or check one out for a free trial at home. We have over 100 assistive hearing devices on hand. Volunteers have ordering information and are available to answers any questions. For more information visit the website at WWW:OKCHearingLoss.org

Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about reverse mortgages for retirees? My wife and I are contemplating getting one but want to make sure we know what we’re getting into. Running Short

 

Dear Running,
For retirees who own their home and want to stay living there, but could use some extra cash, a reverse mortgage is a viable financial tool, but there’s a lot to know and consider to be sure it’s a good option for you.
Let’s start with the basics.
A reverse mortgage is a unique type of loan that allows older homeowners to borrow money against the equity in their house (or condo) that doesn’t have to be repaid until the homeowner dies, sells the house or moves out for at least 12 months. At that point, you or your heirs will have to pay back the loan plus accrued interest and fees, but you will never owe more than the value of your home.
It’s also important to understand that with a reverse mortgage, you, not the bank, own the house, so you’re still required to pay your property taxes and homeowners insurance. Not paying them can result in foreclosure.
To be eligible, you must be 62 years of age or older, own your own home (or owe only a small balance) and currently be living there.
You will also need to undergo a financial assessment to determine whether you can afford to continue paying your property taxes and insurance. Depending on your financial situation, you may be required to put part of your loan into an escrow account to pay future bills. If the financial assessment finds that you cannot pay your insurance and taxes and have enough cash left to live on, you’ll be denied.
Loan Details
Around 95 percent of all reverse mortgages offered today are Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM), which are FHA insured and offered through private mortgage lenders and banks. HECM’s also have home value limits that vary by county, but cannot exceed $679,650.
How much you can actually get through a reverse mortgage depends on your age (the older you are the more you can get), your home’s value and the prevailing interest rates. Generally, most people can borrow somewhere between 50 and 65 percent of the home’s value. To estimate how much you can borrow, use the reverse mortgage calculator at ReverseMortgage.org.
You also need to know that reverse mortgages have recently become more expensive with a number of fees, including: a 2 percent lender origination fee for the first $200,000 of the home’s value and 1 percent of the remaining value, with a cap of $6,000; an upfront 2 percent mortgage insurance premium (MIP) fee on the maximum loan amount, plus an annual MIP fee that’s equal to 0.5 percent of the outstanding loan balance; along with an appraisal fee, closing costs and other miscellaneous expenses. Most fees can be deducted for the loan amount to reduce your out-of-pocket cost at closing.
To receive your money, you can opt for a lump sum, a line of credit, regular monthly checks or a combination of these.
More Information
To learn more, read the National Council on Aging’s online booklet “Use Your Home to Stay at Home” at NCOA.org/home-equity. And see the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association self-evaluation checklist at ReverseMortgage.org/consumerguides.
Also note that because reverse mortgages are complex loans, all borrowers are required to get face-to-face or telephone counseling through a HUD approved independent counseling agency before taking one out. Most agencies typically charge around $125. To locate one near you, visit Go.usa.gov/v2H, or call 800-569-4287.
Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Date/ Day/ Location/ Time/ Registration #/ Instructor
Mar 7/ Thursday/ Okla. City/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 951-2277/ Varacchi
Integris 3rd Age Life Center – 5100 N. Brookline, Suite 100
Mar 8/ Friday/ Okla. City/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 951-2277/ Edwards
S. W. Medical Center – 4200 S. Douglas, Suite B-10
Mar 9/ Saturday/ Midwest City/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 473-8239/ Williams
First Christian Church – 11950 E. Reno Ave.
Mar 9/ Saturday/ Moore/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 799-3130/ Schaumberg
Brand Senior Center – 501 E. Main Street
Mar 12/ Tuesday/ Midwest City/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 691-4091/ Palinsky
Rose State Conventional Learning Center –
6292 Tinker Diagonal, room 203
Mar 22/ Friday/ Okla. City/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 297-1455/ Palinsky
Will Rogers Senior Center – 3501 Pat Murphy Drive
Mar 23/ Saturday/ Shawnee/ 9 am – 3:30 pm/ 818-2916/ Brase
Gordon Cooper Tech. Center – One John C. Burton Blvd.
Mar 23/ Saturday/ Yukon/ 9 am – 4 pm/ 350-5014/ Kruck
Spanish Cove Retirement Center – 11 Palm Ave.

The prices for the classes are: $15 for AARP members and $20 for Non-AARP. Call John Palinsky, zone coordinator for the Oklahoma City area at 405-691-4091 or send mail to: johnpalinsky@sbcglobal.net

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